Week 4: Immigration, Humiliation, and Racism

A month of weekly art and conversation events led by Afghanistan’s youth generation featuring film directors, a playwright and musicians

Date:
Friday, June 22nd 18:00 – 21:00
Location: See You in Iran Hostel (On the map)

Since the first days of the See You in Iran project, the interplay between hospitality and racism among Iranians toward non-Iranians has been one of the most controversial discussion topics. In honor of World Refugee Day, and as the next session of Afghanistan Month event series, we focus on different perspectives and narratives of Afghan diaspora, refugees, asylum seekers, and immigrants through their lived experiences of xenophobia, racism, humiliation, and exclusion, in the context of the incentives for emigration such as lack of resources and opportunities in their home country. In addition, our media wall is dedicated to showcase Sofia Brandes’ photo essay about an Afghan refugee family based in Karaj, Iran.

Talks Itinerary:
– “Living in Tehran as an Afghan Refugee” | Feiz Ahmad Valizadeh (See You in Iran Employee)
– “Challenges, Obstacles, and Achievements of Afghan Refugees in the UK” | Shabnam Nasimi (Master’s Student at Birkbeck University and a Member of Afghanistan and Central Asia Association in London)
– “Emigration and Social Humiliation” | Narmin Nikdel (PhD Student in Sociology at Tabriz University)

Moderator: Navid Yousefian (PhD Candidate in Political Science at UCSB)

Check other events here: Cultural House

Responsibilities placed on Afghanistan’s youth

“In the face of the increasing violence, a lack of unemployment, reduced international aid, and a Government stretched beyond its means, the responsibilities placed on Afghanistan’s youth are only going to get bigger and bigger.

The unfortunate truth is that many Afghan children lack both working parents and ‘compassionate guardians’, and are resigned to a life on the streets. While there is an urgent need to address these challenges, we remember the young Afghans who have made helping their families their main purpose in life.” – Rahila Muhibi, Medium